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Friday, 21 October 2016 09:23

Innovative building technology gains impetus with Marley Building Systems

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Interbuild Africa 2016 showcased Marley Building Systems’ Eco Smart Home – a 45m² innovative building technology structure that combines all of the Marley Building Systems products into one solution, including Kalsi fibre cement external cladding, Siniat internal partitioning and ceilings, and Marley Roofing’s Super 6 roof sheets| Interbuild Africa 2016 showcased Marley Building Systems’ Eco Smart Home – a 45m² innovative building technology structure that combines all of the Marley Building Systems products into one solution, including Kalsi fibre cement external cladding, Siniat internal partitioning and ceilings, and Marley Roofing’s Super 6 roof sheets| |

THE quality, cost and time efficiencies of innovative building technology outweighs any and all of the traditional brick and mortar values. This said however, it is a method of building that is taking time to become entrenched in the South African building industry.

 

What is needed is a paradigm shift towards an environmentally conscious mindset which Marley Building Systems is actively motivating.

 

Innovative building technology is an alternative, energy efficient method of building that has been used for decades of years in the US, Europe and Australia.

 

South Africa is still in the early stages in relation to its international counterparts, however, the country’s burgeoning energy and water crises will undoubtedly expedite the demand for this seamless dry construction building system.

 

Clarence Kachipande, Marley Building Systems’ Specifying Manager: Commercial, said: “Innovation is a key focus area for Marley Building Systems and we believe that innovative building technology will increasingly play a significant role in the delivery and provision of critical built environment infrastructure.”  

 

Recently, the South African government passed a resolution that 60% of all new social infrastructure projects are to use such alternatives, meaning the usage of building materials other than brick and mortar.

Marley Building Systems’ alternative building technology solution comprises galvanised steel of minimal 0.8mm gauge thickness, resulting in load bearing and strengths of up to 550mpa. The 89mm X 41mm C-section profile has studs spaced at either 400mm or 600mm centres, depending on the structural requirements.  

The innovative building technology structure can be clad internally or externally using the full basket of Marley Building Systems product offerings, starting with Kalsi fibre cement boards, an external water resistant material. The insulation is inserted between the studs and the internal cladding, with 15mm Siniat Fire Check plasterboard, meets the fire safety performance requirements of the built structure while achieving a perfect finish.

 

The initial design of the innovative building technology structure has to be fulfilled by a professional such as an architect or engineer. The plumbing and electrical designs are submitted by the respective professionals and then collated by the architect. On completion of the design, a structural engineer is required to certify the structure.

 

Marley Building Systems’ innovative building technology solutions offer a number of distinctive advantages, including:

  • Greater flexibility in spatial design than conventional building materials.
  • Buildings can easily be extended without major costs, and most material can be reused.
  • Superior fire resistance, thermal comfort and acoustical performance.
  • A fast and effective add-on storey extension solution to existing buildings (masonry or steel frame) with little to no interference to the structure or its users.
  • Internal layouts can be easily reconfigured by shifting walls at a later stage. 

Additional Info

  • Source: Marley Building Systems
  • Website: www.marleybuildingsystems.co.za
Read 337 times Last modified on Wednesday, 09 November 2016 12:13
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    While most other industries have undergone tremendous change, the building and construction sector has seen little new technological breakthroughs over the past fifty years. That was until Hennie Botes, the founder of Moladi, came along.

    Realising the struggles of the poor in getting good quality housing, already in the 1980s, Botes decided to do something about it. His solution was the development of a whole new building system, which he named Moladi. The system replaces the cumbersome bricklaying process with an approach similar to plastic injection moulding.

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    I am a toolmaker by trade and completed my apprenticeship with the South African Railways. Toolmaking entails the making of steel moulds to create plastic components. Napoleon Hill’s book, Think and Grow Rich, made a huge impression on me, especially the suggestion that you should “solve a problem and sell the solution.”

    When my wife fell pregnant with our first child, we heard a lot of people complaining about how difficult it was to bath babies having to carry bath water to and fro. To solve the problem, I developed and patented a plastic baby bath that fitted across the bathtub. The design was sold all over the world, resulting in 20 000 sales per month in five years time. The invention gave me the freedom and finances to start Moladi.

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    One of the problems in South Africa, actually with most countries, is that we do not necessarily teach our children things in which they might thrive. We have this dated British schooling system, where you are nothing if you are bad in maths or science. The result is 800 000 unemployed university graduates and a very high unemployment rate amongst school leavers. On the other hand, crafts and trades that could have contributed to economic growth are neglected resulting in a shortage of craftsman, tradesman and entrepreneurs and the closing down of many factories and businesses in the country. We should be teaching “entrepreneurship” in schools – not by teachers, but by entrepreneurs. Fish don’t teach birds to fly.

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    The word came to me while I was praying in my garden. Back then, we did not have internet and I had no idea what it meant. I nevertheless felt that it was supposed to be the name of the company.

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    My idea with the business was to help solve housing problems in South Africa, while generating new employment opportunities and in effect contributing to economic growth. So I supply training in the construction of Moladi houses and licence people who finish the course to build Moladi houses. I prefer working with cooperatives rather than individuals, as it means that people will be checking up on each other. This is especially important when it comes to cash flow. Many new entrepreneurs fail because they tend to splurge on want-to-haves, such as bakkies and new cell phones, instead of the must-haves required to make the business grow. 

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    What has been your greatest challenges in getting Moladi off the ground?

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    How many houses have you built since you have started Moladi?

    We have only built three hundred in South Africa, due to terrible bottlenecks and government bureaucracies. This is bound to change in the nearby future due to rising pressure caused by the shortage of houses and there not being enough skilled artisans companies to help address this shortage. Politically and for the peace of our country, Government can no longer afford to give billions of Rand to unskilled emerging companies who build houses that have to be rebuilt five years later due to bad workmanship and inferior quality of materials.

    Most of our projects have been implemented overseas, in more than 21 countries. We have for example built 800 houses in Mexico and are currently in negotiations for large project in Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Zambia, Ghana, Nigeria, Mauritius and Namibia.

    What is your general impression of the international housing industry?

    Food and shelter, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy, are the most basic needs of any living being. Housing has however become extremely expensive, even in countries like the United Kingdom people are struggling to make ends meet with mortgages being extended to thirty and thirty five years in order to reduce cost of monthly repayments. In developing and third world countries, there tends to be a lot of talk about housing for the poor, especially from politicians. In most of these cases governments are unable to meet the rising demand due to a shortage of know-how, skills and funding.

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    The regulatory requirement enforced on the financial institutions make it very difficult for the ordinary man in the street to qualify for a mortgage and it is this market that needs a different financing option in order to own a home. The automotive industry is a good example of the many different ways of purchasing a car. Maybe the time has come to adapt the homeownership criteria to accommodate the many many that rent purely because they do not fulfil the current stringent lending conditions.

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