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Sunday, 16 April 2017 16:46

How to get South Africa WORKING

Written by  moladi
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How to get South Africa WORKING How to get South Africa WORKING moladi building systems

How to get South Africa WORKING

 A "TOOL" to get the unemployed working - Fight unemployment, hunger and crime through housing

The backlog for Affordable Housing in South Africa are in the millions. The main culprit in increased cost and affordability is "skilled labour*. The lack of artisans in the construction trade continuously escalates due to the fact that there are no new "apprentices" enrolling. Bricklayers and plasterers are only two of the key artisans that effect the cost of building.

moladi has embarked on developing technology primarily to reduce the dependence on skilled labour in order to reduce cost of construction, and also to increase production quality consistently eliminating costly rework.

Although moladi formwork technology is primarily a manufacturer of a re-useable machine made patented formwork system that allows walls to be cast stronger faster for less, the principal focus is on the delivery of the “whole house”. A house consists of many components and the” assembly process” needs to be project managed in its entirety. That means windows, doors, roof, bath, toilet, paint, ceiling, glass, electrical hardware, etc. etc. needs to be planned ordered and supplied in order to avoid a “bottle neck” that would stop production creating “waste” resulting in an increase in cost. This in turn makes the product, the home, unaffordable to the majority of people.

Through creative engineering and sophisticated manufacturing, moladi aims to advance living standards and spaces affordably. moladi is an advanced building technology that utilises an innovative re-usable plastic formwork system #plasticformwork to reduce the required skills to produce quality affordable homes and other structures that are socially acceptable by speeding up delivery and thus reducing cost. By emulating the methodology of the automotive assembly line, moladi implements the principles applied by Henry Ford; reducing cost by increasing production output by de-skilling the production operation, making homes affordable. #moladi

Many people believe that if a house is produced, we have a customer. But, in Africa (and in the rest of the World) we need to create jobs for the customer in order for them to earn money, before they can actually buy the product. So, it is no use producing a house in a factory and trying to sell it to someone that doesn’t have an income or a job. Our focus and passion is to uplift the community by creating job opportunities producing homes" 

Read more

Reduce cost of Housing Construction 

Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over agai expecting different results 

Future of Construction - World Economic Forum

 

moladi moulding mass housing

"Produce moulds to produce components to produce formwork to produce houses to produce jobs to produce income to empower PEOPLE" - Hennie Botes

Click on the link to view the interview conducted with Hennie Botes - Inventor and CEO of moladi - Link 

Read 316 times Last modified on Sunday, 16 April 2017 21:19

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  • Slag use in building system offers multiple benefits

    Alternative construction system company Moladi has developed a means of incorporating mine slag into its Moladi mix, offering mining companies a viable method for recycling their waste material and reducing construction costs when developing mine-site accommodation.

    Moladi founder and CEO Hennie Botes explains that its cement admixture is poured into plastic moulds to form walls. “Using slag instead of sand in the mortar will result in substantial cost savings for mines during the construction of housing units and other site buildings.”

    Further, he notes that, with mines having problems disposing of mine slag, this solution will enable mines to use their waste material to build infrastructure.

    Business consultancy MJC Business Consulting director Marius Lotter adds that, traditionally, mines made use of conventional building methods to construct the various site buildings. However, he suggests that a lack of quality management, logistical challenges, rigid deadlines, theft as well as excessive costs – including those relating to the use and rental of various types of heavy machinery, the contracting of a skilled labour force and the use of labour intensive methods – have resulted in mines looking to alternative building technologies.

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    Lotter adds that Moladi has been successful in implementing its entry strategy for the mining industry and it “foresees that as many as 150 houses will be completed in 2017”.

    The company is also set to supply 150 staff accommodation units at an Mpumalanga project, which has already been approved, and is awaiting the approval of 22 000 units to accommodate staff at another mining project.

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    The company was featured in a World Economic Forum report called ‘The Future of Construction’, published in January, which forms part of a multiyear global economic initiative to guide and support the engineering and construction industry.

    The report notes that Moladi has an advantage over other affordable housing technologies, particularly those using prefabricated building components, because developing countries have notoriously inadequate road infrastructure, which makes transporting fully prefabricated units unviable and could result in the damage of prefabricated components. As Moladi’s system involves the use of lightweight plastic formwork, which is easily transported, it is unlikely to be damaged, regardless of road conditions.

    The system’s formwork is assembled by clipping together a set of injection-moulded, 30 cm × 10 cm × 20 cm plastic panels that are removable, reusable and recyclable. With this system, a building can be constructed in as little as two days.

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    Moladi’s system is generally associated with small affordable housing units, but it can be applied to various infrastructure assets, including schools, hospitals or courthouses, site offices and multistorey buildings.

    Its main advantages are the speed and ease of production, the lower costs and reduced environmental impact, the quality of the end product and a localised supply chain that benefits local communities.

    The cast walls have a strength of between 7 N/mm² and 15 N/mm² – which is significantly stronger than traditional structures.

    The technology has undergone extensive testing and received certification from several African building and standards authorities, including the South African Bureau of Standards and the Tanzania Bureau of Standards. The structures are also reported to be “very earthquake resistant” according to tests conducted by the University of Panama.

    The system has been used to construct several thousand units in 20 countries in Africa, including South Africa, Nigeria and Tanzania. It has also been used in Sri Lanka, Mexico and Panama.

    Moladi is reportedly preparing to expand its footprint to include the UK and other industrialised countries that have a shortage of affordable housing. The report noted that one of the virtues of the Moladi system is that it can be easily adapted to local building codes and conditions by integrating the required reinforcing structures into the cast.

    It concludes that the system is limited to single- or two-storey buildings, but Moladi is working with engineers to upgrade its construction processes and mortar to qualify the use of its system for multistorey buildings.

    Read more - How Elon Musk and other pioneers (moladi) are shaking up the construction industry | World Economic Forum #WEF #moladi #Tesla #HennieBotes #ElonMusk https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/03/elon-musk-innovation-construction-industry/

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    Creating low-cost housing and social infrastructure is a challenge across the globe. A project to create much-needed courthouses in Tanzania may have shown a way ahead.

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    Strong population growth in many developing and emerging countries and mass urbanization – an estimated 40,000 people moving into African cities every day – create a strong demand for affordable housing. Beyond housing, many developing countries are lagging behind in access to social infrastructure and public services such as schools, hospitals or the justice system. Consider Tanzania: the country faces a shortage of 3,115 courtrooms.

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