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Friday, 30 October 2015 14:12

OPEN BIM means Choice

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OPEN BIM is a universal approach to the collaborative design, realization, and operation of buildings based on open standards and workflows. OPEN BIM is an initiative of several leading software vendors using the open building SMART Data Model.

OPEN BIM Program

The OPEN BIM Program is a marketing campaign initiated by GRAPHISOFT®, Tekla® and others to encourage and facilitate the globally coordinated promotion of the OPEN BIM concept throughout the AEC industry, with aligned communication and common branding available to program participants.

OPEN BIM Certification is a technical certification system to help AEC software vendors improve, test and certify their data connections to work seamlessly with other OPEN BIM solutions.

Why is it important?

  1. OPEN BIM supports a transparent, open workflow, allowing project members to participate regardless of the software tools they use.
  2. OPEN BIM creates a common language for widely referenced processes, allowing industry and government to procure projects with transparent commercial engagement, comparable service evaluation and assured data quality.
  3. OPEN BIM provides enduring project data for use throughout the asset life--cycle, avoiding multiple input of the same data and consequential errors.
  4. Small and large (platform) software vendors can participate and compete on system independent, 'best of breed' solutions.
  5. OPEN BIM energizes the online product supply side with more exact user demand searches and delivers the product data directly into the BIM.

OPEN BIM Partners

OPEN BIM represents a modern approach to interdisciplinary collaboration for all members of the AEC industry. The OPEN BIM community welcomes all software vendors, AEC practices (designers, engineers, constructors) as well as building owners, as the OPEN BIM logo is the guarantee for successful and streamlined collaboration on BIM projects - anywhere in the world!

GRAPHISOFT®, Tekla® and other members of the alliance launched a global program to promote OPEN BIM in the AEC industry and the community is constantly growing. To enjoy all its benefits, you are most welcome to join the OPEN BIM community today!

GRAPHISOFT

GRAPHISOFT is the pioneer and leader in developing Virtual Building™ solutions and empowering the broadest community of architects to deliver model-based projects that are better designed, more predictable to construct and less expensive to operate. GRAPHISOFT is part of the Nemetschek Group, member of the buildingSMART Alliance and among the companies who initiated OPEN BIM.

ARCHICAD 19 — Faster Than Ever

ARCHICAD 19 is now faster than ever! No more waiting for views to load. GRAPHISOFT has extended its robust 64-bit and multi-processing technologies with background processing – an industry first for BIM. So ARCHICAD now offers lightning-fast response times and this turbo-charged update to ARCHICAD makes it the undisputed speed leader in the BIM business. More about ARCHICAD

 

Click here to view our listing

Additional Info

  • Source: ArchiCAD
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Landline: 031 764 1314
  • Website: www.archicad.co.za
  • Article Image: ArchiCAD
Read 1253 times Last modified on Monday, 02 November 2015 11:57

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